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Jack Lancien



Jack Lancien enjoyed a 16 year, 888 game pro hockey career. But only 69 of these games came in the NHL - 63 in the regular season and 6 more in the playoffs).

This Regina, Saskatchewan defenseman of Scottish-Irish heritage played his early hockey for the Regina Pats.

He got a brief taste of the NHL in 1946-47 when he appeared in one game for the NY Rangers. He also saw action in the 1947-48 NHL playoffs playing two games for the Rangers. He spent the rest of the time playing for the Rangers farm teams in the AHL and EHL. (NY Rovers and New Haven Ramblers).

Jack's lucky break came during the 1949-50 season when regular defenseman Wally Stanowski went down with an injury. While Jack was recalled he impressed his coaches enough to stay for the rest of the season (43 games).

Jack's defensive play never impressed his bosses sufficiently for them to bring him up until emergency demanded. Strangely enough ,they found his work better in the majors than it was in other surroundings. Jack played 19 more games for the Rangers during the 1950-51 season before being sent down to the minors again.

Jack played in the minors until the 1960-61 season. He mainly played in the WHL and WIHL. His minor teams included Cincinatti Mohawks (AHL), Vancouver Canucks (WHL), Spokane Flyers (WIHL),Spokane Comets (WHL),Trail Smoke Eaters (WIHL) and Rossland Warriors (WIHL). He enjoyed a couple of very fine seasons in the minors.

Here is how Lancien described his game.

"I've always been a blocker and a checker and a skater. I never used the body, except maybe a guy had his head down and was cold turkey and I couldn't pass up the chance to nail him."

During the WW II Jack spend three and a half years with the Canadian Navy where he worked on the mine detachment crew. Jack was a very good golfer who easily could hit the ball over 300 yards. He even thought about becoming a golf pro after his hockey career was over.

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